Protect Your Home from Water Damage

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Did you know, water damage is more likely to occur in your home than fire damage? We protect our homes from catastrophes, but water damage could be just as dangerous.

Plumbing leaks are common anywhere there is running water, such as:

  • Toilets
  • Faucets/Sinks
  • Dishwashers
  • Ice makers
  • Water heaters
  • Tubs/showers
  • Washing machines
  • Internal pipes and hoses

Water damage isn’t only a problem financially; it can lead to serious health risks from chemicals, toxins and mold, such as rashes, asthma or other chronic health conditions. Additionally, recent studies have shown that children with prolonged exposure to water damaged rooms in their home are at a higher risk of developing eczema.

Whether from a slow leak or flooded basement, water damage can be devastating, but there are things that a homeowner can do to mitigate or minimize the extent of the damage.

  • Check for leaks or cracks in hoses that run to the washing machine, dishwasher and refrigerator at least once a year and replace these hoses every five to seven years.
  • Be sure the caulking around tubs and showers is free of cracks.
  • Know where your water main is located and how to shut it off.
  • Install floor pans under appliances to prevent damage from slow, undetected leaks.
  • Use water leak alarms, which will alert you to a leak in basements, laundry rooms, bathrooms, kitchens and sump pumps.
  • Buy a water flow monitoring system, which attaches to your water main and, if flow that exceeds normal use is detected, will automatically shut off the flow of water into your home.

Why are water costs rising?

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Rising water costs have been affecting homeowners across North America. According to a 2013 article on CBC News, “in June 2012, the average home used 192 cubic metres of water.” While that number is quite an improvement over the average usage in 2005, which was 256 cubic metres, that decrease has not translated to a reduced cost for the homeowner. Instead, average rates have increased by more than $150 annually.

Water rate increases are nothing new. Many utilities are finding the increases are necessary to make repairs to aging infrastructure, such as Halifax Water, who faced a $2.6 billion bill for upgrades to the outdated water and sewer system in 2013. Their proposed increase would bring the average water bill to $842.87 per year for homeowners.

As water rates continue to rise, protecting private infrastructure becomes more important each day. Repairing a break or leak may seem simple, but if left unattended, could cost you thousands of dollars in not only repair costs, but also lost water. With any kind of water leak, your money is just dripping away and contributing to the overall rise in rates.

Water rates are driven by a variety of factors such as:

  • Upgrades to aging water systems to ensure you are receiving safe drinking water
  • Increased operation costs, including staff, electric, chemical treatment, infrastructure upgrades and fuel
  • Government rules and regulations, including water protection systems
  • Unique geographic conditions and circumstances that could limit availability, such as drought, areas prone to natural disasters, etc.

With many areas experiencing record-breaking drought conditions, water conservation has become extremely important, dictating extensive infrastructure improvements to fix failing pipelines to protect this precious resource.

Ultimately, when repairs need to be made to infrastructure, the cost is passed down to the consumer by raising rates in an effort to ensure adequate infrastructure repairs and upgrades are not left undone, costing consumers more in the long run.

As far as protection from the high cost of rising water bills, homeowners who conserve water can decrease their water bill. (Check out our previous blog articles about water conservation in the home and yard.) However, water conservation provides only some protection. While consumption may drop, increases in the cost of production, supply and operations may still result in an increased cost for the consumer. Additionally, some water companies in drought-stricken areas in the United States have imposed additional fees on customers who use more than an identified amount of water per month. In California, fines have even been imposed on those wasting water.

As a homeowner, your infrastructure is subject to the same failure potential as that of municipal infrastructure. When private water and sewer lines fail, the repair cost could be thousands of dollars, depending on the length of the line, the location of the line and the problem – costs the homeowner would be responsible for. For many homeowners, it’s not “if these private lines fail” – it’s “when these private lines fail, how will I handle the repair?” Homeowners who want to be prepared have options. They can add funds for service line repairs to their rainy day fund, or they can choose to enroll in warranty programs such as those offered by Service Line Warranties of Canada. For more information about Service Line Warranties of Canada’s programs, visit www.slwofc.ca.

How Service Line Warranties of Canada works with your local government

handshakeHow Utility Service Partners, Service Line Warranties’ parent company, works with your local government. 

Service Line Warranties of Canada (SLWC) operates under a unique public-private partnership model to give homeowners peace of mind that our program is 100% legitimate and a good value for their money.

With the support of your local leaders, we work directly with the public works department to design a custom set of Terms & Conditions that will meet your line responsibility needs.

Our custom Terms and Conditions help ensure that we offer maximum coverage and low denial rates. Through our partnership, SLWC is able to offer consumers affordable prices for coverage, which would not be possible without the partnership. Additionally, SLWC respects your community, which is why we choose not to engage in mass mailing directly to consumers.

Investing in your aging infrastructure

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Aging infrastructure is a growing concern for homeowners in North America and many communities took note of the problems facing not only city infrastructure, but homeowners as well.

While Canada is home to only 0.5% of the worlds population, it contains approximately 7% of the worlds renewable water supply according to Environment Canada. For Canadians, water and sewer lines that bring fresh water and remove waste are essential as Environment Canada identified Canada as one of the highest water uses per capita in the world. A pinhole leak in a water pipe can release thousands of gallons of clean water into the ground. In areas prone to excessive heat and droughts, water is a precious resource few can afford to waste. Additionally, a leaking sewer system can release thousands of gallons of ground pollution into the environment if left broken. People rely on these lines daily to bring fresh water and remove waste from their homes. Their continued functionality is essential to everyday life and maintaining the health and environment of all communities. 

Environment Canada estimates up to 30% of the total water entering supply-line systems is lost to leaking pipes.

While we can’t completely prevent failures to service lines, homeowners can protect their infrastructure with programs like Service Line Warranties of Canada’s warranty program.

For more information, please visit:

Environment Canada
http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&

Water Use
http://ec.gc.ca/eau-water/default.asp?lang=En&n=2AE761EC-1 

Water Wise
http://ec.gc.ca/eau-water/default.asp?lang=En&n=F25C70EC-1

Do I Have a Water Leak?

iStock_000006953014XSmall WP PlumbingWater leaks are often difficult to detect. Even a small crack could leak thousands of gallons of water over time – potentially costing the homeowner thousands in repair costs and high water bills. With a little detective work a homeowner can determine if there is a problem and be prepared to inform the plumber about the issues. How can you detect a water leak?

Symptoms of a Leak

  • An inexplicable rumbling or gurgling sound (usually heard at night when it’s most quiet)
  • Water is bubbling up or pooling in your yard or in the street bordering your property
  • Poor or low water pressure
  • A commode that continues to run even though it hasn’t been used
  • Water bill has increased substantially and your household has not used more water than usual
  • Starting to see cracks in your home’s foundation or concrete / pavement in the basement floor
  • A foul odor near water drains or sewer line
  • Walls or floors feel moist or are discolored where no water has spilled

Is the Leak Inside or Outside my Home?

The best way to determine if the leak is inside or outside your home is through the water meter, which the public utility reads every month to prepare your water bill. Most water meters in single-family dwellings are located in the front yard. If you lift the meter face, you will find a dial, much like a car’s odometer. The numbers on the dial provide the water reading, which is measured in units of “thousands of gallons.”

Before checking the meter, turn off all water-consuming appliances inside and outside. Wait a few minutes and if the numbers on the meter dial are turning, water is flowing. Next, find the turn-on valve usually attached to the spigot in the front yard. Turn the valve counterclockwise. If the numbers on the dial continue moving, there is probably a leak in the front yard between the house and meter. If you have a Service Line Warranties of Canada water line warranty and believe the leak to be in the yard, please call us to report the leak.

Ignoring a leak could result in a breeding ground for mold, which can have an impact on your family’s health. An undetected leak could cause property damage and will increase your water bill costs. A slow drip leak can increase water usage by as much as 5,000 extra gallons a month and a steady, slow stream by as much as 21,000.

Do I need a water or sewer line warranty?

Newspaper Headlines

It’s not uncommon to have homeowners tell us they don’t need a water or sewer line warranty because their lines haven’t broken and will never break. While we’ve uncovered this is far from the truth – many homeowners are unsure if they need a water or sewer line warranty. When evaluating whether or not to purchase a water or sewer line warranty, homeowners must first understand the coverage details. Warranties are not the same as insurance. While insurance typically covers damage to personal property as a result of service line failures, disasters and extreme circumstances (such as fire, flood, etc.), warranties focus on normal wear and tear – such as aging, ground shifting and tree root intrusion. Problems due to normal wear and tear with the sewer and water lines located outside the home are usually not covered under traditional homeowner’s insurance policies and could be very costly to replace or repair.

When considering whether or not to invest in a water or sewer line warranty, consider the following:

Age of the home
It’s common knowledge as products age, the failure rate increases. While newer homes with PVC pipes may be at lower risk than a 50-year-old home with clay pipes, the age of your home can help determine your need. As homes age, so does the infrastructure supplying water to and removing waste from them.

Types of pipes and length of lines
Do you know of what materials the water and sewer lines inside and outside of your home are made? Some materials are more prone to problems and have shorter life expectancies than others. Knowing what the lines are made of can help determine the level of risk. In addition, the longer the line, the greater the risk of failure and the higher the cost to replace them.

Weather
Weather conditions can affect a pipe’s life expectancy and conditions as they swell with changes in temperature and ground shifting. If the area in which you live is prone to heavy rainfall, droughts or extreme temperature changes – your infrastructure could be at risk.

Plants
The closer your water and sewer lines are to the ground’s surface and  plants and trees, the greater the chance of roots permeating the pipes. It only takes a small pinhole for a root to begin to infiltrate the line, which may result in a leak, clog or break.

Cost
What is the cost-benefit ratio? Should you pay a small monthly fee for the warranty or do you have enough in your emergency fund to pay for a repair that could cost from $1,300 to $3,500 or more?

Fine Print
Check out the Terms and Conditions of the warranty. Do they adequately cover your particular situation?

Company
Before buying any product, do your homework; research financial stability, outstanding consumer complaints, etc.

Time
One of the many benefits of participating in a maintenance or warranty program is the ability to make one call to solve the problem. If your service line breaks, consider the time invested in locating a qualified, local plumber and scheduling the visit, which may require taking time off from work and is disruptive to your daily routine.